From September to May, Religious Education (RE) is offered to two age groups on the first and third Sundays of each of these months.

Elementary Children

Children from kindergarten through grade five first begin the morning in the church service with their family. After the “Story For All Ages,” children head off to the RE classrooms. All teaching is grounded in our UU Seven Principles. Kids even have their own simplified version.

Our younger students participate in “Moral Tales,” a module of the UUA Tapestry of Faith curriculum. Lessons center on a story, a moral tale, about making good choices. Many activities are provided to enrich each class.

The UUA Tapestry of Faith Moral Tales Program 

Every day our children go forth into a complex world where they are often faced with difficult decisions and situations. Moral Tales attempts to provide children with the spiritual and ethical tools they will need to make choices and take actions reflective of their Unitarian Universalist beliefs and values. 

Childcare is available to children younger than kindergarten age during the service.

Older Youth

Middle and high school students meet in the library beginning at 10 a.m. on the first and third Sundays of each month during the school year. Our program builds social confidence, personal and religious identity, and friendship bonds that cross generations. Our aim is to grow people who know themselves and are valued for who they are, with all their gifts and quirks.

One of the hallmark programs for young people in middle school and early high school is “Coming of Age.” This mixed age program is offered every few years.

Coming of Age Program

In Coming of Age programs, we explore not only what it means to be Unitarian Universalist (UU), but what it means to be you. Over the course of a year, youth gather for fun workshops, retreats, and justice projects. With mentors and guides, participants explore what they believe, what they find meaningful, and how to build a spiritual “toolkit” to help them as they face the joys, sorrows, wonders, and challenges of being human. Most Coming of Age programs culminate with a rite of passage where each youth shares a Credo, a statement of their beliefs and values.